Medical Marijuana Could Soon Flourish In Central Illinois

The small city of Delavan is strongly looking into the idea of developing a medical marijuana cultivation center. Under the Illinois new law, a cultivation center will be approved for each state police district. The Delavan cultivation center would take care of district 8 in Illinois, covering Marshall, Peoria, Stark, Woodford and Tazewell Counties. Delavan officials say some residents may not like the idea of medical marijuana growing in their city, but argue there is an upside.

City Administrator Joe Woith says economic growth in Delavan has been low for several years. He thinks medical marijuana may be the spark the city needs. “The benefit would be the 25 jobs and also it would be a project in the tif district which would bring in approximately a millions dollars to the school over a twenty year period”, says Woith. He says it would also generate anywhere from $2.5-3 millions dollars for city infrastructure. A medical marijuana cultivation center in Delevan is still very much in the works. But some locals there say they’re on board, if it helps their community. Illinois state police will be in charge of applying state laws and keeping up with how much medical marijuana is grown and transported from the cultivation center.

To read more, visit http://www.centralillinoisproud.com/story/d/story/medical-marijuana-could-soon-grow-in-central-illin/36806/Y7mlEscHLEmYPs4Xyx1RqA

Battle Over Medical Marijuana Pits State-vs-Federal Government

Jennie says that her story has taken a possibly dangerous turn over the last few months. She said that Jack had a bad reaction to prescription drugs and was taken to the Hackensack University Medical Center where they were told that because of their policies, Jack had to either stop taking his medical marijuana immediately, or he couldn’t stay there. They gave us two options, leave and you can continue taking your marijuana or you can stay in the hospital and you have to stop. So abruptly stopping a medication that’s effective and working is very dangerous, Jennie explained.

This problem seems to be present in most states with legalized medical marijuana where the use of it is legal within the state, but its still illegal on a federal level. So if there is a conflict, which laws do you actually follow? When faced with possible legal issues many are siding with the federal government. Jennie took her concerns to a town hall with Governor Christie but he disagreed with her stance and said that the feds would not interfere with New Jerseys program.

Hospitals are afraid of the feds right now because their state hasn’t authorized them to do it and so listen, were not gonna get into a debate back and forth about this, we obviously have a disagreement about this, Christie said to Jennie. In a statement, Dr. Jeffery Boscamp, Chairman of Pediatrics at the Joseph Sanzari Children’s Hospital said: Were in a very difficult position.

To read more, visit http://www.myfoxphoenix.com/story/25598235/battle-over-medical-marijuana-pits-state-vs-federal-government

Time Is Running Short For Medical Marijuana For Kids In Illinois

“I think the biggest struggle will be finding doctors who are willing to sign off on medical marijuana treatment,” Gross said. In addition to doctors, parents will have to ensure marijuana growers cultivate strains of cannabis that are best for epileptic kids — high in CBD and low in THC — like the popular “Charlotte’s Web” variety.

The Illinois bill initially passed the state Senate in April , but it must be re-approved following changes that would allow medicinal marijuana treatment for minors with not just epilepsy, but other debilitating medical conditions, including cancer and Crohn’s disease. While Gross said she’s happy about the state House approval, she’ll feel better once the bill is on Gov. Pat Quinn’s (D) desk. “It’s a good place for us to be for now, but we’re very eager to come home,” she said. Both the Kentucky State Police and Gov. Steve Beshear support the bill. If passed, the law would allow anyone (even children) enrolled in a U.S.

To read more, visit http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/05/23/medical-marijuana-epilepsy-illinois_n_5374418.html

Medical Cannabis Passes NY Senate Health Panel

He said he voted with his conscience to represent some of his constituents that suffer from a rare form of epilepsy that causes them to have multiple seizures a day. “The Compassionate Care Act is the only legislation that has come before the Senate committee which could provide the families of these children with the relief they are seeking,” the 86-year-old Republican told the Associated Press.

While the Senate finance committee is one hurdle, getting it to a vote in the Senate will be another. Due to the power sharing agreement between Republicans and a faction of five Democrats that control the Senate, each leader can block bills from being brought to the floor by using their veto power. Senate Republican Leader Dean Skelos has warmed up to the idea, saying he supports medical marijuana use in oil form, but has trepidation about smoking the drug. Savino’s bill would prohibit patients under the age of 21 from smoking the drug. Republican Sen. Phil Boyle introduced medical marijuana legislation last week for non-combustible use; it would instead be administered through oils, edibles or vaporizers.

To read more, visit http://www.sacbee.com/2014/05/20/6418319/medical-marijuana-slated-for-key.html

Medical Marijuana Bill Hurdles Major Barrier In New York

In an interview with the UK’s Daily Mail in 2011, Nicholson said that he personally still used marijuana, before making the case for ending the prohibition on pot as well as other drugs. “I don’t tend to say this publicly, but we can see it’s a curative thing. The narcotics industry is also enormous. It funds terrorism and – this is a huge problem in America – fuels the foreign gangs,” he said. “More than 85 percent of men incarcerated in America are on drug-related offences. It costs $40,000 a year for every prisoner. If they were really serious about the economy there would be a sensible discussion about legalization.”

In a 2013 American Conservative op-ed chock full of moderate Republican views, Huntsman snuck in a call to “applaud states that lead on reforming drug policy.” While Obama and his administration have responded to state marijuana reforms by saying they must enforce federal laws against marijuana, the president has the power to reschedule the drug, which would allow federal authorities to shift resources away from a prohibitive approach.

To read more, visit http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/05/20/medical-marijuana-new-york_n_5359718.html

Recent Poll Says “Yes” To Medical Marijuana But No To Recreational Pot

But they were much less positive about legalizing recreational marijuana, as the states of Colorado and Washington have done. Less than half of respondents, 43 percent, backed legalization. The greater support for medical marijuana may reflect the emotional appeals of patients as detailed in this NPR report on a successful effort to put medical marijuana on the fall ballot.

One of those stories involves Charlotte Figi, a Colorado girl whose parents lobbied the Florida legislature in January, saying that a marijuana extract reduced the girl’s seizures from 1,200 a month to one or two. But there are no randomized controlled trials testing the safety and effectiveness of the special form of marijuana being used to treat Charlotte Figi and other children, and very few on any use of medical marijuana. For instance, Maine and several other states have approved medical marijuana for treating post-traumatic stress disorder.

To read more, visit http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2014/05/20/310108721/poll-yes-to-medical-marijuana-not-so-much-for-recreational-pot

Colorado Will Spend $10 Million Marijuana’s Medical Benefits Research

Crisanta Duran (D), a co-sponsor of the bill, told The Huffington Post this news update. “Patients will benefit from this investment and Colorado will become a national leader in developing medical marijuana research.” The bill states the research will help Colorado determine which medical conditions should be added to the state’s current list of eight ailments that make patients eligible for medical marijuana. It will also help physicians better understand the biochemical effects of prescribed marijuana, add to the growing base of knowledge built from several state-funded medical cannabis research programs about proper dosing and possibly allow the state to conduct clinical trials, the bill outlines .

“This bill is exciting because it gives researchers the opportunity to show why and how marijuana works, and to do research that the federal government refuses to conduct,” Mike Elliott of Marijuana Industry Group told Huffington Post. The research will be funded through the state’s $10 million medical marijuana program cash fund. “More information is needed to further understand potential therapeutic uses of marijuana and its component parts,” the Medical Marijuana Health Effects Grant Program bill reads. “Research on the therapeutic effects of marijuana and its component parts could benefit thousands of Coloradans who suffer from additional debilitating medical conditions that do not respond to conventional treatments and are not currently permissible medical conditions for medical marijuana use.”

Colorado legalized marijuana for medical use in 2000. There are currently more than 115,000 patients on the state registry. A number of studies in recent years have demonstrated the medical potential of cannabis. Purified forms of cannabis can be effective at attacking some forms of aggressive cancer . Marijuana use has also been tied to better blood sugar control and may help slow the spread of HIV .

To read more, visit http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/05/21/colorado-medical-marijuana_n_5365644.html

Medical Marijuana Passed, NY Senate Health Panel Declares

We are, by no means, at the end of the line yet.” Advocates say recent changes to the Senate bill dubbed the Compassionate Care Act which narrows the spectrum of diseases for which marijuana can be prescribed, made the proposal more palatable to opponents.

The newly amended bill sponsored by Savino narrows that to about 20 conditions, including cancer, HIV, AIDS, post-traumatic stress disorder, multiple sclerosis and Parkinson’s disease. Sen. William Larkin, R-Newburgh, was the lone Republican on the committee to vote in favor of the bill. He said he voted with his conscious to represent some of his constituents that suffer from a rare form of epilepsy that causes them to have multiple seizures a day.

“The Compassionate Care Act is the only legislation that has come before the Senate committee which could provide the families of these children with the relief they are seeking,” the 86-year-old Republican told the Associated Press. While the Senate finance committee is one hurdle, getting it to a vote in the Senate will be another. Due to the power sharing agreement between Republicans and a faction of five Democrats that control the Senate, each leader can block bills from being brought to the floor by using their veto power.

Senate Republican Leader Dean Skelos has warmed up to the idea, saying he supports medical marijuana use in oil form, but has trepidation about smoking the drug. Savino’s bill would prohibit patients under the age of 21 from smoking the drug.

To read more, visit http://www.sacbee.com/2014/05/20/6418319/medical-marijuana-slated-for-key.html

Update On Medical Marijuana: Minnesota Medical Marijuana Law Passes Major Hurdle

After a series of road-bumps, the Minnesota legislature overwhelmingly passed a bipartisan bill that would legalize some medical marijuana use. The new policy, which is considered the most restrictive in the country, only allows patients to consume cannabis by pills and oils.

To read more, visit http://finance.yahoo.com/news/marijuana-weekly-roundup-minnesota-medical-194420702.html

Can Legalization Of Marijuana Hurt Mexican Drug Cartels?

With marijuana being legal in Colorado and with very lenient medical marijuana laws in other states, the effects are being felt in the Mexican drug cartels and the gangs don’t like it, the Daily Kos reported Sunday. In fact, some pot farmers are no longer planting marijuana. Farmers in the Golden Triangle section of Mexico’s Sinaloa state, which is the country’s most prolific pot growing region, say they are no longer planting pot.

The wholesale price of pot has dropped from $100 per kilogram to less than $25. “It’s not worth it anymore”, Rodrigo Silla, 50, a longtime marijuana farmer, told the Washington Post. He couldn’t remember the last time his family and others in their town stopped growing pot. “I wish the Americans would stop with this legalization”, he added.

The Washington Post reports that some of the cartels have turned to producing cheap heroin since they can’t make much money anymore growing pot. Is it hurting the cartels? Yes. The cartels are criminal organizations that were making as much as 35-40 percent of their income from marijuana, said retired federal agent Terry Nelson. They aren’t able to move as much cannabis inside the US now.

A 2012 study by the Mexican Competitiveness Institute found that American state legalization would cut into the drug gang business and take over about 30 percent of their market.

To read more, visit http://www.examiner.com/article/legalize-marijuana-and-hurt-mexican-drug-cartels-studies-show