Colorado Ag Backs Company That Fired Medical Pot Patient For Legal, Off-Duty Use

Colorado is a different story. Amendment 20 says employers are not required to “accommodate the medical use of marijuana in any work place.” But the law does not explicitly state whether an employer has the right to fire an employee who uses medical marijuana at home. Coats’ supporters believe his case has the opportunity to remove this gray area and set a precedent for future medical marijuana patients who use the substance outside the office. “The AG’s ‘affirmative defense’ position diminishes our constitutional rights by attempting to reduce them to a mere ‘get out of jail free card,'” said Kim Ryan, a Denver attorney who has consulted on Coats’ case.

“That is not what citizens voted for — Colorado’s Constitution guarantees a bundle of medical marijuana rights, including to possess, use, transport, and grow, among several other rights spelled out expressly in Amendments 20 and 64. The AG’s position is contrary to the clear public policies in our state protecting citizens with disabilities, and it is heartbreaking that his office is using public resources to go after medical patients’ rights in this way.” “We must never forget that Mr. Coats was a successful worker who simply used a medicine his corporate bosses don’t like,” Ryan added. Coats said he was ranked in the top 5 percent of his fellow telephone customer service representatives and was eventually moved into a more prestigious commercial section of his department. It was where the better employees worked, he said.

To read more, visit http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/06/06/brandon-coats-medical-marijuana_n_5455808.html

Medical Marijuana: State Weighs PTSD For Pot Usage

veterans pot

Arizona’s top health official is considering whether people suffering from PTSD should be allowed to use medical marijuana, which could amount to a big win for veterans and medical marijuana advocates. Arizona’s stop health officials are weighing whether PTSD is a qualifying condition for medical marijuana. (Photo: Pat Shannahan/The Republic) 1655 CONNECT 27 TWEET LINKEDIN 4 COMMENTEMAILMORE Arizona’s top health official is considering whether people suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder should be allowed to use medical marijuana.

Such a decision could amount to a big win for veterans and medical marijuana advocates. Will Humble’s consideration of the issue comes after an administrative law judge on Wednesday recommended state officials allow those with PTSD to use medical marijuana, reversing Humble’s earlier denial. In the past, Humble, director of the Arizona Department of Health Services, has rejected allowing the disorder as a condition that qualifies for legal medical marijuana use, saying there is insufficient research on pot’s effects on PTSD.

Since the inception of the state’s medical marijuana program, veterans and medical marijuana advocates have pushed state health officials to allow PTSD to qualify as a condition. In the past, some veterans have told The Arizona Republic the drug regimes their doctors have put them on are ineffective and have caused damage to organs.

Related: Veterans say marijuana eases PTSD Humble addressed the judge’s Wednesday decision in his blog Thursday night, writing, “I have until July 9 to either accept, reject or modify the recommended decision. I’ll be studying the report and will make a decision after analyzing the Decision and Order.” Humble wrote that last year, he denied a petition to add PTSD to the list of debilitating medical conditions that qualify people for an Arizona Medical Marijuana Registration Card.

To read more, visit http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/arizona/politics/2014/06/06/arizona-medical-marijuana-ptsd-pot/10084151/

Wasserman Schultz Opposes Florida Medical Reefer Referendum

Pro-marijuana group blasts Wasserman Schultz

Following her vote against an amendment to a bill in Congress that would restrict federal agents ability to go after marijuana users in states where the drug is legal, U.S. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz , D- Weston , has also come out against Amendment 2, the proposed state constitutional amendment that would legalize medical marijuana in Florida. The reasoning behind her opposition of the two items is quite different, however.

According to her communications director, Sean Bartlett, voted against the federal amendment because The congresswoman believes that it is not appropriate to limit the ability of the Executive Branch to enforce federal law at their discretion. But when it comes to Amendment 2, the congresswoman’s reasons fall in line with those of many who are already opposed to the state constitutional amendment. I have concerns that it is written too broadly and stops short of ensuring strong regulatory oversight from state officials, she said in a prepared statement.

Other states have shown that lax oversight and ease of access to prescriptions can lead to abuse, fraud, and accidents. Also, given Florida’s recent history in combating the epidemic of pill mills and dubious distinction as having among the highest incidents of fraud, I do not believe we should make it easier for those seeking to abuse the drug to have easy access to it. These reasons that the amendment has a lack of oversight and development of marijuana dispensaries would echo the explosion of pill mills in Florida are similar to those given by Don’t Let Florida Go to Pot, the anti-amendment 2 campaign started by the Florida Sheriffs Association and Drug Free Florida.

This places Wasserman Schultz, who is also the chair of the Democratic National Committee, in unusual company, with the FSA run by Republican Polk County Sheriff Grady Judd and the Drug Free Florida committee chaired by Carlton Turner who, back when he was Ronald Reagan s drug czar, once claimed that marijuana use led to homosexuality and, from there, AIDS. Turners group recently produced a video that cited four loopholes in amendment.

To read more, visit http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/broward/broward-politics-blog/sfl-wasserman-schultz-medical-marijuana-20140606,0,5668427.story

Medical Marijuana Billboard For Wicker Park Consultant Now On Eisenhower

Ashland Ave. before the state’s medical marijuana law was set to take effect in January. Medical marijuana, however, is still not for sale anywhere in the state. Jacobi has also run a similar operation in Saugatuck, Michigan, and Reid said the pair hope to open up additional offices in Michigan as well as Florida. The Wicker Park office began charging potential patients $99 back in August to eventually see a doctor, and the business later came under fire when the state filed a complaint against Brian Murray, once a physician there.

The Illinois Department of Financial & Professional Regulation accused Murray of violating the Medical Practice Act, alleging that Murray was charging for a “pre-certification” for medical marijuana without establishing a legitimate doctor-patient relationship. According to Reid, Murray no longer works there.

Reid and Jacobi continue to charge a $99 fee for doctor visits as well as $159 for their “comprehensive service plan,” which includes, among other things, “In-office Consultation with a Medical Marijuana (MMJ) expert” and “management of the state application process and renewal,” according to the Good Intentions website. The company is also careful not to call itself a clinic these days, and Reid bills Good Intentions as more of a “consulting” business for patients who want to learn more about medical marijuana options.

To read more, visit http://www.dnainfo.com/chicago/20140605/wicker-park/medical-marijuana-billboard-for-wicker-park-consultant-now-on-eisenhower

‘Historic’ Shift In D.C. Over Medical Pot Crackdown

Gregg Paiva weighs and packages hashish in the processing department at Harborside Health. Photo: Tim Hussin, Special To The Chronicle

But a 219-189 roll call last week approved the measure, which would cut off funding for Justice Department enforcement actions that interfere with medical marijuana laws in 22 states and with laws in another 10 states that allow medical use of hemp oils. Like any proposal to ease drug penalties, the amendment still faces a difficult road to final congressional passage. But Farr said the vote by the Republican-controlled House of Representatives reflected a generational and attitude shift, both in Congress and among the public, that has shown up in opinion polls and an increasing number of state laws. “States with medical marijuana laws are no longer the outliers; they are the majority,” Farr said in a statement.

“This vote showed that Congress is ready to rethink how we treat medical marijuana patients in this country.” Libertarian bent It’s also a sign of “emerging libertarian sentiment in the House,” said Ken Grubbs , spokesman for Rep. Dana Rohrabacher, R-Huntington Beach (Orange County), who has cosponsored the measure since 2007, when only a handful of Republicans supported it. Last week, 49 Republicans joined 170 Democrats to win passage in the House. Another conservative California Republican, Tom McClintock of Rocklin (Placer County), is among the sponsors, along with Democrat Barbara Lee of Oakland.

“This is historic, a victory for states’ rights, for the doctor-patient relationship, for compassion, for fiscal responsibility,” Rohrabacher said. But it’s no guarantee of passage in the Democratic-controlled Senate, where one of the most vocal opponents represents the state whose voters were the first to legalize marijuana as medicine 18 years ago.

To read more, visit http://www.sfgate.com/crime/article/Historic-shift-in-D-C-over-medical-pot-5532516.php

Marijuana Activists Target House Members Who Oppose Medical Marijuana Use

Advocates for expanding access to medical marijuana plan to turn up the pressure on members of Congress who arent supporting their cause. Theyre starting with two House members who voted last week against an amendment to the Commerce-Justice-Science appropriations bill that would bar federal government interference on state-approved pot and hemp laws. The amendment passed 219-189, a victory for the bipartisan House coalition that sponsored the measure and supporters of the issue off Capitol Hill but activists aren’t letting detractors off the hook.

Over the next few days, the Vote Medical Marijuana campaign, housed within the medical marijuana advocacy group Americans for Safe Access, will run 30-second TV spots on MSNBC in Maryland and South Florida, the homes of two of the members who voted no Republican Andy Harris and Democrat Debbie Wasserman Schultz. Congressman Andy Harris thinks its OK for medical marijuana patients to go to federal prison, even though Maryland passed a medical marijuana bill in April, a mans voice intones over the first television ad. On May 30, Congressman Harris voted against an amendment to respect marijuana laws and protect Maryland patients. Why would Congressman Harris vote to send patients like this to prison? the voice continues, as an image of a 4-year-old boy who suffers from epilepsy and his mother is displayed.

Seventy-two percent of Maryland residents support medical marijuana. Is Congressman Harris out of touch with Maryland? The ad targeting Wasserman Schultz, one of just 18 Democrats to vote against the amendment and the only member of of leadership to cast a no vote, follows a nearly identical framework. The 30-second spot alleges that Wasserman Schultz wants medical marijuana users to go to federal prison, while 88 percent of Floridians support legalizing access.

To read more, visit http://blogs.rollcall.com/218/marijuana-activists-house-members-medical-use/

How Will Florida Regulate Medical Pot – Tampa Bay Drug Policy

VCDL Protest at Beyer Volvo, Alexandria, VA (28 June 2014)

In California that way got a little out of hand. People could walk in off the street and say that they had a headache and they could leave with some bud. This is not the way that Florida wants to handle this. Florida has until next Summer to get its act together in how they handle this. See, it is a given that this amendment will pass. How we dispense it is the problem. Dispensary locations seem to be the way to go. How many and where to locate them is what is in question.

To read more, visit http://www.examiner.com/article/how-will-florida-regulate-medical-marijuana

Marijuana Isn’t Harmless, Top Health Official Says

Last week, the Republican-controlled U.S. House of Representatives voted in favor of preventing the federal government from interfering with states that allow marijuana use for medical reasons. Medical marijuana is legal in nearly half the states. Teens’ attitudes toward marijuana are shifting as more states legalize the drug. CBS News chief medical correspondent Dr. Jon LaPook talks about … “Public opinion is shifting,” Rep. Dana Rohrabacher, R-Calif., said at the time. In the new article, Volkow and colleagues said marijuana is addictive, contrary to popular opinion.

To read more, visit http://www.cbsnews.com/news/marijuana-isnt-harmless-top-health-official-says/

Wasserman Schultz Opposes Florida Medical Marijuana Referendum

Pro-marijuana group blasts Wasserman Schultz

Following her vote against an amendment to a bill in Congress that would restrict federal agents ability to go after marijuana users in states where the drug is legal, U.S. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz , D- Weston , has also come out against Amendment 2, the proposed state constitutional amendment that would legalize medical marijuana in Florida. The reasoning behind her opposition of the two items is quite different, however. According to her communications director, Sean Bartlett, voted against the federal amendment because The congresswoman believes that it is not appropriate to limit the ability of the Executive Branch to enforce federal law at their discretion.

But when it comes to Amendment 2, the congresswoman’s reasons fall in line with those of many who are already opposed to the state constitutional amendment. I have concerns that it is written too broadly and stops short of ensuring strong regulatory oversight from state officials, she said in a prepared statement.

Other states have shown that lax oversight and ease of access to prescriptions can lead to abuse, fraud, and accidents. Also, given Florida’s recent history in combating the epidemic of pill mills and dubious distinction as having among the highest incidents of fraud, I do not believe we should make it easier for those seeking to abuse the drug to have easy access to it. These reasons that the amendment has a lack of oversight and development of marijuana dispensaries would echo the explosion of pill mills in Florida are similar to those given by Don’t Let Florida Go to Pot, the anti-amendment 2 campaign started by the Florida Sheriffs Association and Drug Free Florida.

To read more, visit http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/broward/broward-politics-blog/sfl-wasserman-schultz-medical-marijuana-20140606,0,5668427.story

Medical Marijuana Billboard For Wicker Park Consultant Now On Eisenhower

Reid and Jacobi continue to charge a $99 fee for doctor visits as well as $159 for their “comprehensive service plan,” which includes, among other things, “In-office Consultation with a Medical Marijuana (MMJ) expert” and “management of the state application process and renewal,” according to the Good Intentions website . The company is also careful not to call itself a clinic these days, and Reid bills Good Intentions as more of a “consulting” business for patients who want to learn more about medical marijuana options. But he is offering his Wicker Park office to doctors who want to see patients, Reid said. The Illinois law , signed by Gov. Pat Quinn in August about a week before Good Intentions opened, stipulates that those eligible for medical pot have at least one of about 40 serious medical conditions, including cancer, AIDS and Crohn’s disease, among others. According to proposed rules submitted by the Illinois Department of Public Health, those hoping to receive medical pot can’t submit an application until September.

Reid said Good Intentions is there to help both patients and doctors navigate the law, which requires patients receive fingerprinting, background checks and photo identification. “These are not [medical] conditions where people just have all the time and energy in the world to fill out state applications,” Reid said. Susan Hofer, a spokeswoman for the Illinois Department of Financial & Professional Regulation, said the complaint against Murray is ongoing and urged caution for those hoping to receive marijuana from anyone other than a doctor. “A person seeking certification for medical cannabis should work with their physician, the one treating the condition for which they believe they’re eligible,” she said.

But Reid said he’s encountered a number of potential patients who don’t have doctors, and that Good Intentions can refer them to the right physician. Reid said he’s also seen a number of people who have been handed fake certifications by so-called doctors promising pot.

To read more, visit http://www.dnainfo.com/chicago/20140605/wicker-park/medical-marijuana-billboard-for-wicker-park-consultant-now-on-eisenhower