Minnesota Lawmakers Agree In Limiting Legalization Of Medical Cannabis

Health-care providers would provide treatment data to the Minnesota Department of Health to enable researchers and policymakers to determine the medical effects of cannabis treatment. Background checks would be required for those working at the manufacturing sites and dispensaries. Anyone participating in the medical marijuana program caught using cannabis for non-medical purposes would be ousted and subject to criminal penalties.

Jennessa Lea, 27, of North St. Paul, was among people who wanted a more liberal law. She and her 6-year-old daughter, Raegan, suffer from Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, a group of inherited disorders that affect connective tissues. Lea said smoking cannabis diminishes the pain enough that she may play with her daughter. “That’s why we need the whole plant,” Lea said, choking up during an interview after the Thursday news conference. “I can’t function when I’m taking only oxycodone to cope.” Twenty-one other states and the District of Columbia allow medical marijuana.

To read more, visit http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/05/15/minnesota-marijuana_n_5333993.html

Minnesota Solons Strike Medical Marijuana Deal

Scott Dibble, DFL-Minneapolis, who sponsored the Senate version, lauded the compromise. “People in Minnesota who are suffering today who have no good options or options at all can have the hope of gaining some relief,” Dibble said during a news conference. Opponents said legalizing medical marijuana in any form would be a step toward legalizing recreational use, and risked addicting more children to pot and other drugs.

“The voices that weren’t represented during this debate were the parents who have lost children to drug abuse, in which marijuana played a part,” said Sen. Bill Ingebrigtsen, R-Alexandria. Ingebrigtsen, a former sheriff, predicted drug treatment costs will soar. He said it was a fantasy if anyone thought that more children wouldn’t use marijuana by legalizing its medical uses. “It’s just like alcohol and tobacco.

To read more, visit http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/wireStory/minnesota-lawmakers-strike-medical-marijuana-deal-23740275

Minnesota Makes Way To Offer Medical Marijuana

“We’re going to get some data that no one else has,” Ehlinger said. “Other states are reeling because they don’t have data. Some people might criticize our program as the most restrictive in the country. But the approach is reasoned to get us where we want to go more safely, and perhaps, more quickly.” Minnesota’s legislation makes it the only state to explicitly ban smoking the drug. It also prohibits patient access to plant material. Instead, the drug would be available in oil, pill and vapor form. Eight medical conditions would qualify for treatment, including cancer, glaucoma and AIDS, with a possible ninth if the health commissioner acts on a House amendment requesting that “intractable pain” be considered.

The terminally ill also could qualify. Patients would receive an identification number if a doctor, a physician assistant or advanced-practice registered nurse certified a qualifying illness existed. Twenty-one other states and the District of Columbia have legalized marijuana for medical use. The toughest task for Minnesota will be creating the structure that governs the doctor-patient-Health Department relationship.

To read more, visit http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/05/17/marijuana-medical-minnesota-drug/9209555/

Medical Marijuana Bill To Be Voted At High Noon On Tuesday By NY State Committee

“The first step in the process is to make sure it gets through the committee process,” said Senate Independent Democratic Conference spokesman Jason Elan. The legislation that would authorize the use of medical pot to treat specific “serious, debilitating, life-threatening” chronic llnesses. Savino recently amendmed the bill to allow its use for rheumatoid arthritis. But at the uring of the state’s ophthalmologists, it would not cover glaucoma. Savino has said she has at least 39 votes for the measure in the chamber.

In a video earlier this week , Savino said: “This shouldn’t be about politics. This should be about science. We shouldn’t handcuff our doctors from making the best decision on how to treat their patients. We may have the facts on our side — but we still need your support.”

She noted that 21 states have already adopted medical pot laws. Passage of the measure would be a big help for Savino and four other breakaway Democrats who control the Senate with the Republicans.

To read more, visit http://www.nydailynews.com/blogs/dailypolitics/medical-marijuana-bill-nys-senate-committee-vote-high-noon-tuesday-blog-entry-1.1793877

Medical Marijuana Is Okay

Mark Dayton has said he will sign the legislation. The state is poised to become the 22nd to legalize the drug for medical purposes. Minnesota Public Radio says, “Under the agreement, the state will authorize two medical cannabis manufacturers to set up operations in Minnesota and distribute the product in pill or liquid form to qualified patients at up to eight distribution centers by July 1, 2015.” However, smoking marijuana would still not be legal. Instead, patients would be allowed to vaporize “whole plant extracts,” but not dried leaves, MPR says.

The Associated Press says the deal is “a major victory to severely ill children and adults whose emotional appeals for help propelled a major policy change that once appeared dead for the session.” The AP says: “Some patients lamented that the agreement doesn’t allow them to use actual plant material – they instead can use the drug in oil, pill and vapor form – but others were overjoyed.”

MPR reports: “The bill calls for a state patient registry and an observational study of the effect cannabis in treating a limited list of qualified conditions, including cancer, glaucoma, HIV/AIDS, Tourette Syndrome, Crohn’s Disease, ALS and seizures. “Law enforcement groups that opposed earlier proposals, are taking a neutral position on the new compromise. The Minnesota Medical Association also took a neutral stand.”

To read more, visit http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2014/05/15/312474443/minnesotas-legislature-oks-medical-marijuana

Minnesota Lawmakers Strike Deal With Medical Marijuana

But it covers fewer conditions than the Senate favored. Its prohibition against using plant material disappointed some advocates, who said vaporizing the leaf or smoking the drug were the only ways some patients could get relief from their maladies. Sen. Scott Dibble, DFL-Minneapolis, who sponsored the Senate version, lauded the compromise. “People in Minnesota who are suffering today who have no good options or options at all can have the hope of gaining some relief,” Dibble said during a news conference.

Opponents said legalizing medical marijuana in any form would be a step toward legalizing recreational use, and risked addicting more children to pot and other drugs. “The voices that weren’t represented during this debate were the parents who have lost children to drug abuse, in which marijuana played a part,” said Sen. Bill Ingebrigtsen, R-Alexandria. Ingebrigtsen, a former sheriff, predicted drug treatment costs will soar.

To read more, visit http://news.yahoo.com/minnesota-lawmakers-strike-medical-marijuana-103537878.html

State Senate Expected Voting On Medical Marijuana Bill Tuesday

The state Senate Health Committee is set to take up a medical marijuana bill at high noon on Tuesday. The vote is the first of its kind in the Senate. If it passes, the bill would move on to the Senate Finance Committee. From there, it could go before the full Senate for a vote before the end of the legislative session next month.

Senate bill sponsor Diane Savino (D-Staten Island) has said 39 members support the bill, far more than the 32 needed to pass legislation. Sipkin, Corey/New York Daily News Senate bill sponsor Diane Savino (D-Staten Island) has said 39 members support the bill, far more than the 32 needed to pass legislation.

“The first step in the process is to make sure it gets through the committee process,” said Senate Independent Democratic Conference spokesman Jason Elan. The legislation would authorize the use of medical marijuana to treat specific “serious, debilitating, life-threatening” chronic illnesses. Savino recently amended the bill to allow its use for rheumatoid arthritis. It would not cover glaucoma. In a video earlier this week, Savino said: “This shouldn’t be about politics.”

To read more, visit http://www.nydailynews.com/news/politics/state-senate-vote-medical-marijuana-bill-tuesday-article-1.1794050

Feds Against Medical Marijuana Use While Tolerating The Use Of Commercial Cannabis

The seeds of this bizarre situation were planted in July 2012, when the Stevens County Sheriffs Office received a tip from the Civil Air Patrol that someone was growing marijuana near the Colville Airport. A few weeks later, Sgt. Brad Manke flew over the area and spotted about 70 marijuana plants. Based on that evidence, the sheriffs office obtained a search warrant for the property, which it served on August 9.

Rhonda Firestack-Harvey, Larrys wife, told the officers that she, her husband, their son, their daughter-in-law, and a family friend were using the marijuana to treat various conditions, including gout, osteoarthritis, wasting syndrome, and chronic pain from severe back injuries. All five have medical recommendations, which under a ballot initiative approved in 1998 gives them an affirmative defense against possession and cultivation charges. The 74 plants found by the sheriffs office were within the limits set by Washington law, which allows each patient to grow up to 15 plants.

To read more, visit http://www.forbes.com/sites/jacobsullum/2014/05/15/feds-prosecute-medical-marijuana-patients-while-tolerating-commercial-cannabisall-in-the-same-city/

Lagrange Limits Medical Marijuana Dispensary Locations To Industrial Zones

The LaGrange Village Board voted Monday to tighten restrictions limiting where a possible medical marijuana dispensary can locate within the village, the Doings reported. It was originally proposed to locate a dispensary in the commercial general service district, but not the villages downtown business district along LaGrange Road. Instead, village trustees voted to locate a medical marijuana district in LaGrange’s light industrial area.

Such a dispensary would also be required to seek a special use permit and public hearing. Tanya Griffin of Western Springs, who said she represents a group of local doctors and pharmacists, had originally proposed to locate a medical marijuana dispensary in a vacant property at 120 E. Burlington Ave., the Doings said. Its essentially a vote that says not in my town, Griffin told the paper. The vote was in reaction to new state law for a pilot program allowing 22 marijuana cultivation centers and 60 dispensaries for patients with certain medical conditions.

One dispensary is permitted for the area covering Lyons, Lemont and Palos townships. Lyons Township High School senior Andrew Lipchik stated: I think the dispensaries should be allowed if were talking about having a healthy community to promote all different situations and ideologies. Trustees were divided on overturning the village plan commissions recommendation to allow a dispensary in the commercial district. Saying it was conceivable that the state would allow the sale of recreational marijuana from dispensaries in the future, Trustee Jeffrey Nowak was opposed to the idea.

To read more, visit http://westernsprings.patch.com/groups/politics-and-elections/p/lagrange-limits-medical-marijuana-dispensary-location-to-industrial-area-westernsprings

San Jose City Council Stalls Vote On Medical Marijuana Dispensaries

If approved, dispensaries would have to be at least 1,000 feet away from schools, day care centers, churches, recreation centers, parks, libraries and other collectives, 500 feet from rehab centers and 150 feet from homes. The dispensaries would also only be allowed to offer marijuana that they have cultivated themselves.

At Tuesday nights meeting, medical marijuana advocates said that’s the wrong approach. I am tired of watching this city council try to gain political points by passing measures that harm the disabled, said one speaker. Advocates also said that these proposed regulations would lead to a larger black market for medical marijuana, and force many dispensaries to close up shop and go out of business. But those in favor of the proposed regulations said pot clubs have been bad neighbors. Clients go through our parking lot at a high speed, park wherever they please, and leave their litter everywhere, said one speaker at Tuesdays meeting.

To read more, visit http://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/2014/05/14/san-jose-city-council-delays-vote-on-medical-marijuana-dispensaries/